Ryan Davis’ new film out

Ex TSFG member Ryan Davis has written and produced the film ‘Fixed’, now out.

Ryan says: We are showing Fixed and doing a Q and A at the amazing Mockingbird Cinema on 14th November at 8pm. Tickets are available here: boxoffice@mockingbirdcinema.comAlso… From 22nd November, you will also be able to watch the film on Amazon, iTunes, Xbox, Google and The Sky Store.

Liz Kershaw shortlisted for Historical Writers’ Association Award.

Liz has been shortlisted for the Historical Writers’ Dorothy Dunnett Short Story Award and will be included in a forthcoming anthology (details later). Her story ‘Guard of Honour’ was praised as: ‘Perfect writing and sharply observed characterisations as one man makes a choice.’

More details here: https://historicalwriters.org/hwa-dds-short-story-competition/

Anthony Ferner’s ‘Inside The Bone Box’ reviewed

https://sabotagereviews.com/2021/07/28/inside-the-bone-box-by-anthony-ferner/

from the review: ‘The portrait that Anthony Ferner paints in this Fairlight Moderns novella, of Nicholas Anderton, a successful neurosurgeon, is like a painting in which a skilful artist has used colours you had never before realised existed in skin tones to convey a man’s complexity and depth. Ferner has clearly researched his subject thoroughly, and to convincing effect. He spares the reader none of the visceral details of brain surgery: as in other arenas of life that simultaneously repel and attract, we may feel squeamish about the contortions of the hidden and essential soft tissue inside our skulls and yet find ourselves horribly fascinated. No wonder. This is, after all, the location of all we are as sentient beings, and the precise and detailed descriptions of Anderton’s work are in large measure what make Inside the Bone Box a compelling read.’

Two Joel Lane novels re-issued.

Influx Press are re-issuing two of the late Joel Lane’s novels:

We’re delighted to be publishing two more Joel Lane reissues! First is Lane’s brilliant debut novel, FROM BLUE TO BLACK – a journey through our musical and political past that cuts to the bone. With a new introduction by @Kerry2001. Pre-Order here: https://influxpress.com/shop/from-blue-to-black-paperback-pre-order

Amanda Smyth’s new novel is out!

Amanda’s third book ‘Fortune’, published by Peepal Tree Press is launched online on July 21st 2021. You can book tickets here.

The book has already gained some excellent reviews. The Guardian called it ‘magnificently absorbing’ and compared her to Jean Rhys. Review here. Perspective Magazine announced it was ‘pitch perfect’ , one of their recommended reads. Review here. Newsday called it ‘brilliant’. Review here.

Charles Wilkinson’s new book ‘Mills of Silence’ out now.

Charlie’s third book from Egaeus Press promises to be another scintillating read from this master of the weird and unsettling. As the Press put it:

‘Anybody fortunate enough to have read either of Egaeus Press’s previous Charles Wilkinson collections (A Twist in The Eye & Splendid in Ash) will already be familiar with the unique worlds his tales inhabit. On the face of it, these are often recognisable realities populated by ordinary people; conspicuously so perhaps! Yet they are realities whose gossamer veneers are liable to tear, prone to reveal the insidious agencies, mad philosophers, fake-philanthropic organisations and amorphous forces that are really running things!

‘With Mills of Silence, Charles Wilkinson presents a collection of eleven short stories as well as a previously unpublished novella, constituting his most expansive and essential work to date.’

Read more here.

Rebecca Johnson on ‘how I became a novelist.’

Rebecca joined TSFG in 2017 and although she has since moved to Spain, she remains a remote member (via Zoom). In her blog she writes about her struggle with illness and her first steps with novel writing.

‘As well as a source of invaluable creative feedback and publishing advice from fellow writers, Tindal Street helped me take my first shaky steps out into the world again, and returned a sense of belonging and purpose to my reclusive days laid up at home feeling ostracised from society. It allowed me to think of myself as a novelist, instead of as a sick person. I started taking care of my appearance again, and even made it out to the pub on one occasion! The group was an important part of my rehabilitation process and I owe it so very much.’

Read it in full here.